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6-1 Forum Tips Win 98, Me

 

 

Sub Section of Forum Tips
Section 6-1: Forum Tips
  1. Protected-Mode CD-ROM Drive Support in Windows
  2. Troubleshooting MS-DOS Compatibility Mode on Hard Disks
  3. USB Devices May Not Work in Windows 98 Second Edition
  4. How to Troubleshoot Computer Hangs During Hardware Detection.
  5. My Iomega Zip was given drive letter "B", how do I correct this?

 

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6-1-1: Protected-Mode CD-ROM Drive Support in Windows

 

Protected-Mode CD-ROM Drive Support in Windows

The information in this article applies to:

SUMMARY

This article discusses protected-mode CD-ROM drive support in Windows. The following topics are discussed:

MORE INFORMATION

Determining If Windows Supports Your CD-ROM Drive in Protected Mode

Windows does not include protected-mode drivers for specific CD-ROM drives. Instead, Windows provides protected-mode access to CD-ROM drives by including protected-mode drivers for the SCSI, IDE, and proprietary controllers that CD-ROM drives are connected to. The CD-ROM controller may be built into the motherboard, a separate controller, or a sound card. If Windows includes a protected-mode driver for the device that your CD-ROM drive is connected to, your CD-ROM drive is most likely supported in protected mode.

Windows includes protected-mode drivers for proprietary CD-ROM controllers from the following manufacturers:

In addition, Windows includes protected-mode drivers for many sound cards and SCSI and IDE controllers. To determine if Windows includes a protected-mode driver for the sound card or SCSI or IDE controller that your CD-ROM drive is connected to, follow these steps:

  1. In Control Panel, double-click Add New Hardware.

  2. Click Next, click No, and then click Next.

  3. Click the type of device that your CD-ROM drive is connected to in the Hardware Types box, and then click Next.

    If your CD-ROM drive is connected to a sound card, you need to determine what type of CD-ROM controller is built into the sound card. It will be a SCSI controller, an IDE controller, or a proprietary CD-ROM controller. To determine the type of CD-ROM controller built into the sound card, consult the sound card's documentation or manufacturer. Note that the manufacturer of the sound card may not be the same as the manufacturer of the controller built into the sound card.

    If the CD-ROM drive is connected to a SCSI controller, click SCSI Controllers in the Hardware Types box. If the CD-ROM drive is connected to an IDE controller, click Hard Disk Controllers in the Hardware Types box. If the CD-ROM drive is connected to a proprietary CD-ROM controller, click CD-ROM Controllers in the Hardware Types box.

  4. Click the manufacturer of the device that your CD-ROM drive is connected to in the Manufacturers box. If the specific device that the drive is connected to appears in the Models box, Windows includes a protected-mode driver for the device and the CD-ROM drive is most likely supported in protected mode.

    If the manufacturer of the device does not appear in the Manufacturers box or the specific device does not appear in the Models box, Windows does not include a protected-mode driver for the device and the CD-ROM drive is not supported in protected mode.

For information about specific CD-ROM drives that require real-mode drivers to either work in Windows or be detected by Windows, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

ARTICLE-ID: Q131499
TITLE : CD-ROM Drives Requiring Real-Mode Drivers


Obtaining Protected-Mode CD-ROM Drivers from Other Sources

If Windows does not include a protected-mode driver for the SCSI, IDE, or proprietary CD-ROM controller that your CD-ROM drive is connected to, contact the manufacturer of the device to inquire whether a protected-mode driver that is compatible with Windows is available. If no protected- mode driver is available, real-mode drivers must be used.

Alternatives to Protected-Mode CD-ROM Drive Support

When you are using real-mode drivers for your CD-ROM drive, the Performance tab in the System Properties dialog box shows that your CD-ROM drive is using MS-DOS Compatibility mode. To prevent this message from being displayed, you must use protected-mode drivers for the CD-ROM drive.

If your CD-ROM configuration is not supported by the protected-mode drivers included with Windows, you should be able to use the real-mode drivers included with the CD-ROM drive to provide real-mode access to the drive in Windows. Note that Windows does not include real-mode CD-ROM drivers. If you must use real-mode drivers for your CD-ROM drive, use the CD-ROM driver included with the drive. For information about how to obtain, install, or configure the real-mode CD-ROM driver, consult the documentation included with the drive, or contact the drive's manufacturer.

If you do not know the correct syntax to load the real-mode CD-ROM driver, there may be a file named Config.dos in the root folder of the boot drive that contains the correct syntax. If the driver is not installed on the computer, you must reinstall it. For information about how to do so, consult the CD-ROM drive's documentation or manufacturer.

Notes:

Loading Real-Mode Drivers in Addition to Protected-Mode Drivers

In most cases, you do not need to load real-mode drivers in addition to the protected-mode drivers. For information about CD-ROM drives that are supported in protected mode, but require real-mode drivers to either work in Windows or be detected by Windows, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

ARTICLE-ID: Q131499
TITLE : CD-ROM Drives Requiring Real-Mode Drivers


NOTE: Even if real-mode drivers are not necessary for accessing the CD-ROM drive in Windows, they are necessary for accessing the drive when you boot to a Windows command prompt or you restart the computer in MS-DOS mode. Therefore, you may want to disable (instead of remove) the real-mode CD-ROM driver in the Config.sys file and Mscdex.exe in the Autoexec.bat file, and keep a copy of the real-mode CD-ROM driver on the hard disk. For additional information concerning CD-ROM access after installing Windows 98, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

ARTICLE-ID: Q189526
TITLE : Unable to Access CD-ROM Drive After Installing Windows 98

**Article from Microsoft`s KB**

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6-1-2: Troubleshooting MS-Dos Compatibility Mode on Hard Disks

 

Troubleshooting MS-DOS Compatibility Mode on Hard Disks

The information in this article applies to:


SYMPTOMS

The Performance tab in System properties shows that one or more of the hard disks in your computer is using MS-DOS Compatibility mode. MS-DOS compatibility mode may be in use for either the file system or for virtual memory. You may receive the following message:

CAUSE

MS-DOS Compatibility mode may be in use for any of the following reasons:

RESOLUTION

To correct the problem, follow these steps:

  1. Use the Performance tab in System properties to identify which drive is using MS-DOS Compatibility mode and why.

    NOTE: Floppy disk drives and CD-ROM drives operating in MS-DOS Compatibility mode cause the Performance tab to display the message "Some drives are using MS-DOS compatibility" for the file system, but this article applies only to troubleshooting hard disks operating in MS-DOS Compatibility mode. For information about troubleshooting floppy disk drives, please click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    Q131690 Troubleshooting Floppy Disk Drive Problems in Windows

    1. If the driver name listed as causing MS-DOS Compatibility mode is MBRINT13.SYS, your computer may be infected with a boot-sector virus, or you are running real-mode geometry translation software (for an IDE hard disk with more than 1024 cylinders) that is not compatible with Windows 95 protected-mode disk drivers.

      For information about real-mode geometry translation software that is compatible with Windows 95 protected-mode disk drivers, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

      ARTICLE-ID: Q126855
      TITLE : Windows 95 Support for Large IDE Hard Disks


      Disk Manager 6.03 is supported in protected mode on hard disks on the primary IDE channel and when DriveSpace disk compression is not installed. For drives on the secondary IDE channel, Disk Manager 7.0 or later is required. When using the DriveSpace compression software that is included with Microsoft Windows 95 and Microsoft Plus!, Disk Manager 7.04 or later must be used. For more information, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

      ARTICLE ID: Q126855
      TITLE : Windows 95 Support for Large IDE Hard Disks


      For information about detecting and removing boot-sector viruses, please see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

      ARTICLE-ID: Q82923
      TITLE : Methods to Detect a Boot-Sector Virus

      ARTICLE-ID: Q129972
      TITLE : Description of Computer Viruses

      ARTICLE-ID: Q49500
      TITLE : List of Anti-Virus Software Vendors

       

    b. If a driver that is listed in the CONFIG.SYS file is named, contact the driver's manufacturer to determine whether there is a version of the driver that allows protected-mode access in Windows 95.


    If no driver is listed on the Performance tab, continue with Step 2.

     

  2. Check to make sure that the hard disk controller is listed in Device Manager. If it is not listed, install it with the Add New Hardware Wizard. If the Wizard does not detect the controller, run the Wizard again but do not let the Wizard detect the hardware in your computer. Instead, select the controller from the hardware list. If the controller is not listed, contact the manufacturer of the hard disk controller to determine whether there is a Windows 95 protected-mode disk driver or a Windows 3.1 32-bit disk access (FastDisk) driver available.

    NOTE: If the hard disk controller is listed in Device Manager but has a red X over it, it has been removed from the current hardware profile. Click Properties for the controller in Device Manager and then click the check box corresponding to the current hardware profile under Device Usage.

  3. If the hard disk controller is listed in Device Manager but has a yellow exclamation point over it, there is an IRQ, I/O, DMA, or RAM address conflict with another device, the protected-mode driver is missing or damaged, or the "Disable all 32-bit protected-mode disk drivers" check box is selected in File System properties.

    1. Check to make sure that the "Disable all 32-bit protected-mode disk drivers" check box has not been selected on the Troubleshooting tab in File System properties. To access this tab, double-click System in Control Panel, click the Performance tab, and then click File System.

    2. Resolve any resource (IRQ, I/O, DMA, or RAM address) conflicts with other devices. Consult the controller's documentation for information about resource usage and changing resource usage.

    3. Check to make sure that the protected-mode driver is in the Windows\SYSTEM\IOSUBSYS directory and is loading properly. To determine which driver is providing 32-bit disk access, click Properties for the controller in Device Manager and click the Driver tab to see which driver files are associated with the controller.

      NOTE: If you are using an IDE, EIDE, or ESDI hard disk controller, the Driver tab may not be present when you click Properties for the controller in Device Manager. Unless you are using a third-party driver, Esdi_506.pdr is the protected-mode driver that is used to provide 32-bit disk access for these controllers.

      Restart Windows 95 and press F8 at the "Starting Windows 95" message, and then choose Logged (/BOOTLOG.TXT) start from the Windows 95 Startup Menu. Examine the just-created BOOTLOG.TXT file to determine if the driver listed above is loading properly.

      In Windows 98, press and hold the CTRL key until you see the Windows 98 Startup menu, and then choose Logged (/BOOTLOG.TXT).

      If the BOOTLOG.TXT file shows an "Init Failure" or "Load Failure" message for the driver listed above, proceed with step D. If the BOOTLOG.TXT file shows an "INITCOMPLETESUCCESS" message for the drive listed above, examine the IOS.LOG file.

      Windows 95 creates an IOS.LOG file in the Windows directory if any drives are using MS-DOS Compatibility mode. The first few lines of the IOS.LOG file may contain information describing why the protected-mode disk driver failed to load. Please have this information available if you contact Microsoft Product Support Services about this problem.

    4. Make sure the protected-mode driver is not damaged.

      For all ESDI and IDE drives, Windows 95 uses ESDI_506.PDR in the IOSUBSYS directory to provide 32-bit disk access. For SCSI controllers, Windows 95 uses SCSIPORT.PDR and a "mini-port" (.MPD) driver to provide 32-bit disk access.

      Manually extract the appropriate .PDR or .MPD files from the Windows 95 disks or CD-ROM, or run Setup and choose the Verify option.

     

  4. Check to see if the Mh32bit.386 driver is being loaded in the System.ini file. Check for a line that reads "device=mh32bit.386." This driver is installed by MicroHouse EZ-Drive software, and is not compatible with the Windows 95 protected-mode disk drivers. This driver is not removed by Windows 95 Setup.

  5. Contact the hard disk controller's manufacturer for information about Windows 95 compatibility. You may be able to get protected-mode, 32-bit disk access in Windows 95 by using one of the following methods:

     

MORE INFORMATION

A real-mode driver is "safe" if its functionality does not exceed the functionality of the corresponding Windows 95 protected-mode driver. If a real-mode driver is safe, the protected-mode driver can take over all I/O operations for the corresponding device. Otherwise, Windows 95 routes all I/O operations through the real-mode driver.

An example of an unsafe driver is a real-mode IDE/ESDI driver that uses dynamic encryption for security reasons. Since Windows 95 does not provide encryption, Windows 95 does not allow the protected-mode IDE/ESDI driver to take over the real-mode driver. Any real-mode driver with functionality on the following list is considered unsafe:

The safe driver list (the IOS.INI file) is a Windows 95-maintained list of safe drivers. Each entry in the list identifies a driver or TSR that Windows 95 can take over with the corresponding protected-mode driver. The safe driver list includes the name of the driver or TSR. This name should be the same as the name in the CONFIG.SYS or AUTOEXEC.BAT file.

Windows 95 does not store the version number of the driver or TSR in the list, so it is the responsibility of the vendor to change the name of the driver if a future version of the driver is enhanced in a manner that makes the driver unsafe.

By default, the following drivers are considered safe:

NOTE: If the real-mode driver you are using has better performance or provides some functions that are not be present in the Windows 95 protected-mode driver, the driver's vendor should remove the driver from the safe driver list. The system will use real mode to access the drive. If the real-mode driver you are using can be safely taken over by protected-mode drivers, the driver's vendor can add that driver to the safe driver list.

Disk Manager is manufactured by OnTrack Computer Systems, a vendor independent of Microsoft; we make no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding this product's performance or reliability.

EZ-Drive is manufactured by Micro House, a vendor independent of Microsoft; we make no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding this product's performance or reliability.

**Article from Microsoft`s KB**

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6-1-3: USB Devices May Not Work in Windows 98 Second Edition

 

USB Devices May Not Work in Windows 98 Second Edition

The information in this article applies to:


SYMPTOMS

Universal Serial Bus (USB) devices that are plugged in to a computer running Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition may not work if the following hardware components are installed on the computer:

CAUSE

This behavior occurs because there is a timing-specific problem in the Universal Host Controller driver (Uhcd.sys), which may prevent USB devices from enumerating under specific timing conditions.


RESOLUTION

To resolve this issue, download and run the appropriate file for your language version of Windows.

NOTE: This update only applies to Windows 98 Second Edition. For additional information about USB devices in Windows 98, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q258773 How to Enable Universal Serial Bus (USB) Support

The following files are available for download from the Microsoft Download Center. Click the file names below to download the files:

English:

240075up.exe

Chinese (Traditional)

240075tw.exe

German:

240075de.exe

Spanish:

240075es.exe

French:

240075fr.exe

Italian:

240075it.exe

Japanese:

240075ja.exe

Portuguese:

240075pt.exe

Swedish:

240075sv.exe

Release Date: Oct-15-1999

For more information about how to download files from the Microsoft Download Center, please visit the Download Center at the following Web address

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/search.asp

and then click How to use the Microsoft Download Center.

Microsoft used the most current virus detection software available on the date of posting to scan this file for viruses. Once posted, the file is housed on secure servers that prevent any unauthorized changes to the file.



This fix should have the following file attributes or later:

   Date       Time     Version     Size     File name
   --------------------------------------------------
   08/20/99   1:14pm   4.10.2223   30,528   Uhcd.sys  


STATUS

Microsoft has confirmed this to be a problem in Windows 98 Second Edition.

**Article from Microsoft`s KB**

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6-1-4: How to Troubleshoot Computer Hangs During Hardware Detection.

 

How to Troubleshoot Computer Hangs During Hardware Detection

The information in this article applies to:

SYMPTOMS

When you attempt to install Windows 98, Setup may stop responding (hang) during the hardware detection process. During this phase, Windows 98 Setup determines what hardware components are installed in your computer. This phase requires you to restart your computer either once or twice, depending on the type of hardware in your computer. You can identify this Setup phase by the "Setting Up Hardware" screen.

The following troubleshooting methods are described in this article:

CAUSE

Your computer may hang because of various hardware issues. If you are trying to upgrade, this behavior can occur because of conflicts with previous hardware settings. If you are trying to install a full version of Windows 98, this behavior can occur because of incompatible hardware, hardware that is located in the wrong bus slot on the motherboard, or Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) settings.

RESOLUTION

To resolve this issue, try the following troubleshooting methods:

Restart Your Computer

You may be able to address this issue by restarting your computer. Turn off your computer, and then turn it back on. If Windows 98 Setup does not continue, try the next method.

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Restart in Safe Mode and Use Msconfig.exe

Restart your computer, press and hold down the CTRL key after your computer completes the Power On Self Test (POST), and then choose Safe Mode from the Startup menu. For additional information about Windows 98 startup, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q178548 No 'Starting Windows 98' Message at Startup

After your computer restarts in Safe mode, use the System Configuration Utility tool (Msconfig.exe) to minimize conflicts that may prevent your computer from finishing Setup.

To start and use the System Information tool:

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Information.

  2. On the Tools menu, click System Configuration Utility.

  3. On the General tab, click Selective Startup, and then click to clear the following check boxes:

     

  4. Click OK, and then restart your computer when you are prompted.

If Setup finishes, use the following steps to return your computer to a typical startup mode. If your computer continues to stop responding (hang), use the steps in the "Check the Hardware Configuration" section .

  1. Run System Configuration Utility, click to select one selective startup item, click OK, and then follow the instructions on your screen to restart your computer and test hangs or unusual behavior.

  2. Continue this process until all of the selective startup items are selected. If you select an item and your computer hangs or behaves unusually, click the tab for the corresponding item, clear half of the check boxes, click OK, and then restart your computer. Continue this process until you locate the setting that is causing the problem.

  3. If you can restart your computer successfully when all items are selected, run System Configuration Utility, click to select the Normal Startup check box, click OK, and then follow the steps on the screen to restart your computer.

For additional information about using Msconfig.exe, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q192926 How to Perform Clean-Boot Troubleshooting for Windows 98

 

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Check the Hardware Configuration

To check the hardware configuration on the computer, restart your computer in Safe mode and use Device Manager to troubleshoot the installed hardware. To do this:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click System.

  2. On the Device Manager tab, disable all devices under the following branches:


    To disable a device in Device Manager, use the following steps.

    NOTE: If you have a serial mouse and you disable the COM ports, if Windows writes back to the BIOS that the COM ports are disabled, you will have no mouse functionality until you enable the COM ports in the BIOS again.

    1. Double-click the branch that contains the device you want, click the device, and then click Properties.

    2. On the General tab, click to select the Disable in this hardware profile check box, and then click OK.

    3. Restart your computer.

    NOTE: When you disable the mouse and then restart your computer, you may receive the following message:

    Windows did not detect a mouse attached to the computer. You can safely attach a serial mouse now.

    To enable the mouse, use the following keyboard commands:

    1. Press CTL+ESC to activate the Start menu.

    2. Press UP ARROW until Settings is selected, press RIGHT ARROW to select Control Panel, and then press ENTER.

    3. Press DOWN ARROW and LEFT ARROW until System is selected, and then press ENTER.

    4. Press RIGHT ARROW to select the Device Manager tab, press TAB, press TAB, and then press DOWN ARROW to select the device listed under the expanded Mouse branch.

    5. Press TAB to select Properties, press ENTER, press TAB to select Enable Device, and then press ENTER.

    6. Click OK, and then click YES to restart your computer.

    7. If the mouse still does not work after step E, press TAB, and then press ENTER. Press ENTER when you receive the prompt to restart your computer.

  3. If Setup continues, enable the devices you disabled in step 2 after Setup is finished, and then verify that no devices are conflicting. Enable the devices in the following order:


    To enable a device and check for possible conflicts, follow these steps:

    1. Double-click the branch that contains the device you want, click the device, and then click Properties.

    2. On the General tab, click to clear the Disable in this hardware profile check box.

    3. On the Resources tab, verify that there are no conflicts listed in the Conflicting Device List box. Note that the Resources tab does not appear for every device.

    4. Click OK, and then restart your computer.

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Check the Log Files

Another troubleshooting method that may help to determine the cause of the issue is to examine the Setup log files. Three files are created during Setup:

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Install in a New Folder

If the problem persists, install Windows in a new folder for testing purposes. You can use the following Setup command to troubleshoot a specific module:

setup /p b

The /p switch causes Setup to pass string(s) directly to Detection Manager (Sysdetmg.dll). Setup does not interpret the content of the string. The string can contain one or more detection options.

The b switch enables Prompt Before mode. It prompts you before a detection module is called so that you can step through each detection module manually and decide if you want to skip it. The default is disabled.

For additional information about installing Windows 98 in a new folder, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q193902 How to Install Windows 98 Into a New Folder

 

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Check for Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) Issues

On certain motherboards, Windows 98 may not be able to successfully complete the Plug and Play detection process. This issue may be caused by an incorrect interpretation of data stored in the computer's BIOS. If you have tried the steps in the previous methods and your computer still hangs during hardware detection, contact the computer's manufacturer to see if you need an upgrade before you install Windows 98 on your computer.

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Upgrading over Windows 3.1

If you are upgrading from Microsoft Windows 3.1, you may have a damaged Windows 3.1 group (.grp) file. If you have a damaged group file, use the Group Converter tool to re-create the groups. To do so, use the following steps:

  1. Turn off your computer for at least ten seconds, and then turn it back on.

  2. Click Start, click Run, type grpconv.exe in the Open box, and then click OK.

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Using Novell intraNetWare Client version 2.2

If you are upgrading from Microsoft Windows 95 with the Novell intraNetWare Client version 2.2 for Windows 95 software (also known as Client32) installed, contact Novell about obtaining an updated Nwsipx32.dll file.

The third-party products discussed in this article are manufactured by vendors independent of Microsoft; we make no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding these products' performance or reliability.

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MORE INFORMATION

For additional information about troubleshooting hardware issues after Setup finishes, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q133240 Troubleshooting Device Conflicts with Device Manager

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6-1-5: My Iomega Zip was given drive letter "B", how do I correct this? (Thanks goes to Sudeep Pal for the information)


The Iomega Zip drive may receive a floppy drive letter when a jumper is
placed in the middle position of the drive. This tells the drive to write
disks as bootable. Disks written with this drive while this jumper is placed
there, will most likely have difficulties being accessed by other drives.

Remove this jumper, and format your Zip disks. This should alleviate any
complications you have been experiencing.

Iomega Customer Support

Another suggestion from Russell Caauwe ( date:06/19/2001)

Change the setting in your BIOS from "Auto" to "None" will also corrected this issue.

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